Posts Tagged ‘church plant’

IMG_57911United Methodists across Indiana celebrate their newest United Methodist Church.  The Garden Community Church, led by the Rev. Dr. Carolyn Scanlan-Holmes, was officially constituted (chartered) on Sunday, June 4, 2017.   At the recent Annual Session of the Indiana Conference in Indianapolis, Bishop Julius Trimble, Central District Superintendent Jim Bushfield, and the Director of Church Development Steve Clouse officially presented The Garden representatives its charter.   Emily Reece, Associate Director of Church Development, also participated.  She along with many others–former Central District Superintendent Bert Kite, and retired and present St. Luke UMC pastors Kent Millard and Rob Fuquay respectively–all played an instrumental part in this exciting milestone.

UnknownThe Garden was founded years ago by St. Lukes United Methodist under the leadership of Linda McCoy, an associate pastor of St. Lukes.  Dr. McCoy had the vision of a unique worshiping congregation that would be attractive especially to those uninterested in traditional churches.  So, since its beginning in September of 1995, the congregation has been meeting at the Beef & Board Dinner Theatre in Indianapolis, worshiping in the round, seated at tables.

Twenty years later, Linda McCoy retired, St. Lukes decided to spin The Garden off as a separate congregation, and Carolyn Scanlan-Holmes–a former staff person of St. Lukes–was tapped to lead the new congregation.

Dr. Scanlan-Holmes, writes to the nearly 500 people who are a part of The Garden on its website:  “It was a joy to be witness to the planting of The Garden some 20 years ago and to see how it has grown. I give thanks for Linda, for her passion and vision in this groundbreaking ministry.  I am honored to be appointed to serve the legacy that has been cultivated.  I believe God has and will continue to transform the world through The Garden ministry.  We are reminded that to everything there is a season and this is a time in our culture when new ways of planting Gods love and grace are needed.  I am so looking forward to working alongside you as together we plant and tend new seeds of hope and love for the future.”

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May God continue to bless this congregation as it enters its new chapter of ministry.  May it continue to bear much fruit!

— Ed Fenstermacher, Associate Director for Church Development

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God continues to move in the Indiana Conference in amazing ways.  One such way is the addition of a new Korean United Methodist Church in West Lafayette named Korean Disciple that is already averaging around 100 in worship and has baptized nine people, including six adults.  Praise God!

church-plantingIts founding pastor, Jong Hyun Jung (a.k.a. Tim) has this to say…

“Korean Disciples Church started as a non-denominational church on July 7, 2013. Two families along with me (pastor Tim) began to gather together to pray for a new Korean church that is dedicated to serving the Korean community in the Greater Lafayette area in the summer of 2013. At the top of our goals was to make disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the area. I was the first leader of the church, and we first met in the lounge at the Purdue Village Community Center. We had 20 people attend the first worship on July 7, 2013.

“And, then, God sent us an amazing wave of revival and it grew to almost 100 in a year. As the number of people who come to our worship increased, we were in a desperate need for a place that is large enough to hold all of us. At that moment, Craig LaSuer, a lead pastor of First United Methodist Church in West Lafayette, graciously let us use the building at a very low rate, which helped us keep the momentum. We now develop many ministries and actively serve Korean undergraduate students who study at Purdue University.

“Because of my plan to graduate from Purdue University (I am a Ph.D. student in sociology at Purdue University), Korean Disciples Church formed a pastoral search committee and looked for a new pastor to fill in my shoes. With almost over 90% of yes from all-congregation vote, Korean Disciples Church decided to welcome Pastor Kookjin Yun (an UMC elder pastor) as our next senior pastor and become affiliated with UMC. The whole congregation is very excited about this transition. Our prayer request is that God helps us go through this transition period smoothly and make a great stride in making disciples of Jesus Christ in the Greater Lafayette area.”

Northwest District Superintendent, Rev. Chris Newman-Jacobs, points out “There are approximately 5,000 Koreans in the West Lafayette/Lafayette area and as one of their [Korean Disciples Church] leaders remarked, ‘About 200 of them attend other Korean congregations.  That means there are 4,800 more that we need to connect with and invite into the saving grace of Jesus Christ.’  Their spirit of mission outreach and evangelism is inspiring and exciting.  I believe this is an outstanding opportunity for the Indiana Conference a new population of disciples in the Lafayette area.”

The Conference Church Development Committee recently approved a $50,000 grant to help the congregation as it continues to develop and reach more people with the Good News of Jesus Christ.  Indiana Conference has two other Korean congregations, in Indianapolis and Bloomington, and we warmly welcome our newest sister congregation into our UM family!

— Ed Fenstermacher, Associate Director of Church Development

Kristo's-131020aSt. Joseph United Methodist Church in Fort Wayne, Indiana, has been spearheading a non-attractional church plant on the Fort Wayne’s south side the past few years called Kristo’s Hands and Feet.  Steve Mekura, the effort’s leader, recently reviewed an updated discipling plan with leaders from St. Joseph.  What the leaders discovered was that Kristo’s wasn’t a project that simply flowed from the mature Christians of St. Joseph to the non-believers and new believers in the south part of town.  God turned it around and now the Kristo’s project is actually challenging and shaping how St. Joseph members view disciple making where they live too.  Typically God, huh?

Here are comments from one St. Joseph member…

“The conversation completely changed for me when Steve started describing his formalized discipleship plan.  My heart was not open to the idea.  I thought our mission field is filled with people that often aren’t home, miss events, etc… there is no way we’re going to be able to convince them to stick to such a plan. I was skeptical that the idea of laying it out in such an intentional way, to people who have only begun to walk with or understand Christ, was way too much to ask.

“Then I started thinking about myself, “How would I react if someone from our church leadership asked the same of me?” What if there was something to hold me accountable for areas my personal spiritual growth is struggling and how I could be discipling others – which would both elevate my growth and impact others.  The thought was still terrifying and seemed like a huge undertaking – but the possibility of the growth it could bring began to be exciting.

“Then the conversation turned to responsibility … if I’m spiritually responsible for discipling those around me through the church activities I participate in, how does that change the way I act? What if everyone had that change in mentality, so that we are all discipling each other?  Putting aside the community for a moment, how would that change the culture of Saint Joseph?  What would it look like if instead of saying, “I get to hang out at camp with 27 senior high youth,” the conversation changed to the challenge of discipling them?  What if when we returned from camp, someone held me accountable for each person and asked what conversations I had with them … how I helped them grow for Jesus.  It would change the dynamic completely.  It could change the dynamic of Saint Joseph completely.  If it spread across Fort Wayne, it would change Fort Wayne completely.

“I commented that following Christ was never supposed to be easy, but we tend to make it very easy.  Maybe it’s time to make it more of a challenge.  Steve’s comment about ministry doesn’t end when he crosses Coliseum stuck with me too.  We need to be engaged in ministry at all times.

“The way God is leading us is consistent with what I felt at camp this year as well.  God loved us first, which the speaker turned into a verb: firstlove.  My takeaway from that week was, “Firstlove. Love first.” If we combine a genuine love for everyone with an intentional missionality focused on making true disciples, the possibilities are pretty exciting.

“Now, we do have to be careful not to make ministry a corporate chore. It still needs to flow out of a joy and not a duty … but if God is giving us joy by serving him, it may be important to formally recognize that comes with duty and responsibility as well. – Ryan”

— Ed Fenstermacher, Associate Director of Church Development

10869435_843136035744611_6827256694248204505_oAs we begin 2015, the Indiana Conference of The United Methodist Church is proud to announce that it once again has a church worshiping in the city of East Chicago after a twenty year hiatus.  East Chicago is a city of 30,000 residents, half of whom are Hispanic, located in northwest Indiana.

The new church is Torre Fuerta (Strong Tower), led by Esequiel and Suri Becerra.  It was started by the Becerra’s six years ago and has been meeting in the Hammond First UMC’s building much of this time.  The church, which has around 100 people in the congregation, began renovating a former Boys and Girls Club facility located in East Chicago over a year ago.  After much hard work in remodeling a portion of this large facility, Torre Fuerta received its occupancy permit and was able to celebrate Christmas worship in East Chicago.

In the mid 1980’s, the former North Indiana Conference attempted to start a new congregation in the city targeting Hispanics.  Additionally, First United Methodist Church of East Chicago, after years of decline, closed in 1994 and its building was sold.  Since then, there has been no United Methodist presence in the city, that is until now.

Over the past few years, the Indiana Conference has been encouraging the development of Torre Fuerta, providing it with Church Development grants totaling $180,000.  Nearby First United Methodist Church also graciously provided the use of its facility for the congregation, and its pastor, Rev. Shannon Stringer, has been providing leadership for Torre Fuerta’s steering committee.

We celebrate with the Becerra’s and the Torre Fuerta congregation as they serve and disciple the people living in the East Chicago-Hammond area!  May God richly continue to bless their efforts!

— Ed Fenstermacher, Association Director of Church Development